New app helps Sherman elementary school with flu prevention

Blue Bell: Testing helps create safe treats post-2015 recall

Blue Bell issues cookie dough ice cream recall

Grayson County reports first West Nile Virus death

Blue Bell issues chocolate chip cookie dough ice cream recall

Grayson College treating three buildings for mold

Zika mosquito in Ardmore

Big Food's biggest trend? Crusading against Big Food

City of Denison breaks ground on new park

Grayson Co. reports first human West Nile case of 2016

Local mosquito control company shares how to stay safe during spraying

City of Van Alstyne to spray Monday night for mosquitoes

Mylan launching cheaper, generic version of EpiPen

Pilot Point spraying for mosquitoes after confirmed Zika case

More Grayson County test pools positive for West Nile virus

U.S. government won't reclassify marijuana, allows research

City of Ada keeps ambulances running

Medicare releases hospital ratings

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CBS News Health Headlines

Cold caps chilled with dry ice to 30 below zero can help breast cancer patients keep their hair. In the most recent study, roughly 66 percent of women who used cold caps kept 50 percent of their hair. Barry Petersen reports.
First on Morning Rounds, amid National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, CBS News chief medical correspondent Dr. Jon LaPook looked at the advances in treating metastatic breast cancer. Also on "CBS This Morning: Saturday," Dr. LaPook is joined by CBS News contributor Dr. Tara Narula to discuss new guidelines for children's media use, and more.
“We have a lot of work to do to improve survival for metastatic breast cancer,” says N.Y. doctor working to develop new treatments
The American Academy of Pediatrics has relaxed its guidelines on screen time for young children. Screen time for children under 18 months was previously discouraged. Now, video chatting is OK. Dr. Tara Narula reports.

WebMD Health News

But, medical recommendation is to stay out of game after head injury

New review offers parents advice on how to be more careful with postings that could affect their children

Suggestions include no screen time for those under 18 months, not using media as 'soothing tool'

In small trial, patients were able to grow new cartilage in the joint

Study found both were linked to lower risk of leading cause of blindness

AP Top Health Stories

Afghan men gather raw opium on a poppy field on the outskirts of JalalabadThe cultivation of opium poppy in Afghanistan, the world's main source of heroin, has risen to its third-highest level in more than 20 years, the United Nations confirmed on Sunday, as the Taliban insurgency gains ground. In the key findings of its annual Afghanistan opium survey, the U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) said the total area of land devoted to poppy cultivation had risen 10 percent in 2016 to 201,000 hectares (497,000 acres). "The survey shows a worrying reversal in efforts to combat the persistent problem of illicit drugs and their impact on development, health and security," UNODC Executive Director Yury Fedotov said in a statement.

Trump delivers remarks at a campaign event in Gettysburg, PennsylvaniaU.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump promised on Saturday to foil a proposed deal for AT&T to buy Time Warner if he wins the Nov. 8 election, arguing it was an example of a "power structure" rigged against both him and voters. Trump, whose candidacy has caused ruptures in his party, listed his policy plans for the first 100 days of his presidency in a campaign speech in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, near the site of a Civil War battlefield and a celebrated address by President Abraham Lincoln. Many of the policy ideas Trump listed on Saturday were familiar, not least his promise to build a wall on the border with Mexico to deter illegal immigration and to renegotiate trade deals and to scrap the Obamacare health policy.

The White House on Saturday condemned the use of chemical weapons by the Syrian government after an international inquiry found its forces responsible for a third toxic gas attack in Syria's civil war. The fourth report from the 13-month-long inquiry by the United Nations and the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), the global chemical weapons watchdog, blamed Syrian government forces for a toxic gas attack in Qmenas in Idlib governorate on March 16, 2015, according to a text of the report seen by Reuters. In August, the third report by the inquiry blamed the government of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad for two chlorine attacks - in Talmenes on April 21, 2014 and Sarmin on March 16, 2015 - and said Islamic State fighters had used sulfur mustard gas.
By Babak Dehghanpisheh QAYYARA, Iraq (Reuters) - Up to 1,000 people have been treated for breathing problems linked to fumes from a sulfur plant set ablaze during fighting with Islamic State in northern Iraq and U.S. officials say U.S. forces at a nearby airfield are wearing protective masks. A cloud of white smoke blanketed the area around the Mishraq sulfur plant, near Mosul, mingling with black fumes from oil wells that the militants torched to cover their moves. Local residents and the U.S. military said Islamic State militants deliberately set the sulfur plant ablaze as they strive to repel an offensive by Iraqi government forces to drive them from Mosul, their last major stronghold in the country.
Nearly 1,000 people have been treated for breathing problems linked to toxic gases from a sulfur plant which Islamic State militants are suspected to have set on fire near the city of Mosul, hospital sources said on Saturday. No deaths were reported in connection with the incident, said the sources at the hospital in Qayyara, a town south of Mosul. A sulfur plant caught fire earlier this week as the Iraqi army dislodged Islamic State fighters from the area of Mishraq, north of Qayyara.