KXII Health Headlines

Unapproved device buys time for new pair of lungs

Posted: 07/02/2014 - PITTSBURGH (AP) - An Oklahoma man is slowly gaining strength at a Pittsburgh hospital with a second set of transplanted lungs in a procedure that was possible only through a device that until now hasn't been used in the U.S.

Warning signs and how to prevent a drowning

Updated: 06/19/2014 - DENISON, TX -- As the temperatures rise in Texoma, lifeguards and emergency crews are concerned about an increase in drowning accidents as more people hit the water.

FDA prepping long-awaited plan to reduce salt

Posted: 06/17/2014 - WASHINGTON (AP) - Food companies and restaurants could soon face government pressure to make their foods less salty - a long-awaited federal effort to try to prevent thousands of deaths each year from heart disease and stroke.

Safe Family: BB gun problems

Posted: 05/22/2014 - IOWA -- An Iowa woman is warning parents about the dangers of BB guns. She was hit in the chest and it is now lodged in her body. Vanessa Peng has her story in today's safe family report.
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Kids get codeine in ER despite risks, guidelines

Posted: 04/21/2014 - CHICAGO (AP) - Despite recommended limits on codeine use in children, the potent painkiller is prescribed for children in at least half a million emergency room visits each year, a study suggests.

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  • Elderly Colorado man deemed incompetent in nursing home killing
    By Keith Coffman DENVER (Reuters) - An 87-year-old Colorado man who suffers from Alzheimer's disease is incompetent and will not face criminal charges for beating to death a fellow dementia patient at a nursing home, prosecutors said on Friday. Homer Castor is in an advanced stage of the degenerative disease, and should be confined to a mental hospital for the slaying of 76-year-old Gerald Propp, the Jefferson County District Attorney's Office said in a statement. Castor was arrested in February after police said he attacked Propp with his fists at the Attria Applewood assisted living center in the Denver suburb of Lakewood.
  • Amgen ends partnership with AstraZeneca on psoriasis drug

    A sign is seen at an AstraZeneca site in MacclesfieldAmgen Inc said it will terminate a collaboration with AstraZeneca Plc to develop a psoriasis drug after it observed suicidal thoughts in the subjects of a trial. Amgen said such safety concerns would likely result in a restrictive label that could limit the number of patients using the late-stage experimental drug, brodalumab. The company needs drugs like brodalumab at a time when many of its drugs face competition from cheaper copies, RBC Capital Markets analyst Michael Yee said.


  • Mother found pushing dead toddler on swing in Maryland park
    (Reuters) - A Maryland mother was found early on Friday pushing her dead 3-year-old boy on a park swing, authorities said. Deputies responded to a call around 7 a.m. to check on a woman who witnesses said had been pushing a child for hours on a swing at Wills Memorial Park in La Plata, about 35 miles (55 km) south of Washington, D.C., said Charles County Sheriff's Office spokeswoman Diane Richardson. When the officers arrived they found the 24-year-old woman still pushing the child in the swing, and they realized immediately that the boy was dead, Richardson said.
  • Smokers more likely to think cancer is a death sentence
    By Madeline Kennedy (Reuters Health) - Smokers have more pessimistic attitudes about cancer and may be more likely to delay getting screened, according to a new survey from the UK. Smokers are less likely to engage in cancer screening programs and are less engaged with health services overall, senior author Jane Wardle told Reuters Health in an email. “We wanted to investigate why, by exploring whether this could be partly due to excessively negative beliefs about cancer,” said Wardle, the director of the Health Behavior Research Center at University College London.
  • Exercise may cut risk of death among elderly men
    By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - Elderly men who exercise regularly – even by doing light activities like walking – may be less likely to die than those who are sedentary, a large Norwegian study suggests. Researchers followed about 5,700 men for about five decades, starting in the 1970s when they were 45 years old on average, to see how their exercise habits influenced longevity. Men who got about 30 minutes of exercise six days a week appeared to reduce their risk of death by 40 percent.
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