KXII Health Headlines

Unapproved device buys time for new pair of lungs

Posted: 07/02/2014 - PITTSBURGH (AP) - An Oklahoma man is slowly gaining strength at a Pittsburgh hospital with a second set of transplanted lungs in a procedure that was possible only through a device that until now hasn't been used in the U.S.

Warning signs and how to prevent a drowning

Updated: 06/19/2014 - DENISON, TX -- As the temperatures rise in Texoma, lifeguards and emergency crews are concerned about an increase in drowning accidents as more people hit the water.

FDA prepping long-awaited plan to reduce salt

Posted: 06/17/2014 - WASHINGTON (AP) - Food companies and restaurants could soon face government pressure to make their foods less salty - a long-awaited federal effort to try to prevent thousands of deaths each year from heart disease and stroke.

Safe Family: BB gun problems

Posted: 05/22/2014 - IOWA -- An Iowa woman is warning parents about the dangers of BB guns. She was hit in the chest and it is now lodged in her body. Vanessa Peng has her story in today's safe family report.
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Kids get codeine in ER despite risks, guidelines

Posted: 04/21/2014 - CHICAGO (AP) - Despite recommended limits on codeine use in children, the potent painkiller is prescribed for children in at least half a million emergency room visits each year, a study suggests.

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  • Boom starts Tour despite low cortisol levels

    Astana rider Nibali of Italy cycles with team mate Dutch rider Boom during a training session in UtrechtBy Julien Pretot UTRECHT, Netherlands (Reuters) - Dutchman Lars Boom started the Tour de France on Saturday despite showing low levels of cortisol in a test on the eve of the race. Boom had an outside chance of victory in Saturday's 13.8-km time trial but eventually finished 23rd, 44 seconds behind winner Rohan Dennis of Australia. "I did not have the best preparation," Astana rider Boom told reporters.


  • Cycling-Boom starts Tour despite low cortisol levels
    (Writes through) By Julien Pretot UTRECHT, Netherlands, July 4 (Reuters) - Dutchman Lars Boom started the Tour de France on Saturday despite showing low levels of cortisol in a test on the eve of the race. Boom had an outside chance of victory in Saturday's 13.8-km time trial but eventually finished 23rd, 44 seconds behind winner Rohan Dennis of Australia. "I did not have the best preparation," Astana rider Boom told reporters.
  • Kenya's main port sacks 27 strike leaders as losses hit $2 mln
    By Joseph Akwiri MOMBASA (Reuters) - East Africa's biggest port in the Kenyan city of Mombasa said on Saturday it had dismissed 27 workers it believed were behind a strike this week that paralysed operations for two days and cost the port at least $2 million. Over 2,000 workers went on strike on Wednesday and Thursday in protest against higher deductions for the government's national health insurance scheme, prompting port management to threaten to fire them, having advertised their positions. The work stoppage has disrupted business at the biggest port in the region, which handles imports such as fuel for Uganda, Burundi, Rwanda, South Sudan, eastern Democratic Republic of Congo and Somalia.
  • Boom to start Tour despite low cortisol levels

    Astana rider Nibali of Italy cycles with team mate Dutch rider Boom during a training session in UtrechtBy Julien Pretot UTRECHT, Netherlands (Reuters) - Dutchman Lars Boom will start Saturday's first stage of the Tour de France despite showing low levels of cortisol in a test on the eve of the race, his Astana team manager said. "Boom will take the start," Alexander Vinokourov told reporters. Astana, the team of defending Tour champion Vincenzo Nibali, are members of the MPCC (Movement for Credible Cycling) that applies stricter rules than the International Cycling Union (UCI) and the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA).


  • Right to die: Colombian man ends life with government backup

    In this June 19, 2015 photo, Dr. Gustavo Quintana, who helps people with terminal illnesses end their lives, speaks during an interview in Bogota, Colombia. Most of the procedures he performs are in people’s home, with the patient surrounded by loved ones. Sometimes music is played. During the nine minutes the procedure typically lasts he whispers the same soothing mantra while injecting a cocktail of lethal drugs: “Rest, you’re going to sleep for the last time, a restorative sleep.” (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) — Dr. Gustavo Quintana walks out of a modest, two-floor apartment building in southern Bogota. Inside his black doctor's bag are vials containing anesthesia and muscle relaxants, a syringe and a rubber tourniquet. The man known in Colombia as Dr. Death has just ended the life of his 234th patient: a middle-aged woman suffering from incurable stomach cancer.


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