KXII Health Headlines

Unapproved device buys time for new pair of lungs

Posted: 07/02/2014 - PITTSBURGH (AP) - An Oklahoma man is slowly gaining strength at a Pittsburgh hospital with a second set of transplanted lungs in a procedure that was possible only through a device that until now hasn't been used in the U.S.

Warning signs and how to prevent a drowning

Updated: 06/19/2014 - DENISON, TX -- As the temperatures rise in Texoma, lifeguards and emergency crews are concerned about an increase in drowning accidents as more people hit the water.

FDA prepping long-awaited plan to reduce salt

Posted: 06/17/2014 - WASHINGTON (AP) - Food companies and restaurants could soon face government pressure to make their foods less salty - a long-awaited federal effort to try to prevent thousands of deaths each year from heart disease and stroke.

Safe Family: BB gun problems

Posted: 05/22/2014 - IOWA -- An Iowa woman is warning parents about the dangers of BB guns. She was hit in the chest and it is now lodged in her body. Vanessa Peng has her story in today's safe family report.
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Kids get codeine in ER despite risks, guidelines

Posted: 04/21/2014 - CHICAGO (AP) - Despite recommended limits on codeine use in children, the potent painkiller is prescribed for children in at least half a million emergency room visits each year, a study suggests.

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  • For next president, a way out of the health care fights?

    This image provided by the Department of Health and Human Services shows a portion of the HealthCare.gov Website. Republican or Democrat, the next president will have the chance to remake the nation’s health care overhaul without fighting Congress. The law signed by President Barack Obama includes a waiver that, starting in 2017, would let states take federal dollars now invested in the overhaul and use them to redesign their own health care systems. (AP Photo/HHS)WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican or Democrat, the next president will have the chance to remake the nation's health care overhaul without fighting Congress.


  • Merck files for FDA approval of Keytruda in lung cancer
    Merck & Co Inc said on Sunday it has submitted an application to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for its drug Keytruda as a treatment for advanced non-small cell lung cancer, the most common form of the disease. Keytruda, also known as pembrolizumab, is currently approved by the FDA for patients with advanced melanoma who are no longer responding to other therapies. The drug is part of a new class designed to help the body's own immune system fend off cancer by blocking a protein known as Programmed Death receptor (PD-1), or a related target known as PD-L1, used by tumors to evade disease-fighting cells. Merck said the FDA submission is based on trial data in patients for which testing showed that at least half of their tumor cells contained PD-L1.
  • Australia to boost child vaccination with $20 mn package

    Australia has unveiled a Aus$26 million (US$20 million) package to increase child vaccination rates, as it removed a religious exemption allowing parents unwilling to immunise their children to claim some government benefitsAustralia on Sunday unveiled a Aus$26 million (US$20 million) package to increase child vaccination rates, as it removed a religious exemption allowing parents unwilling to immunise their children to claim some government benefits. Health Minister Sussan Ley said the new measures, which will be part of the May 12 federal budget, included the establishment of a national school vaccination register and financial incentives for doctors to pursue children two months overdue for their immunisations. "In fact, what happens is your children maintain immunity from diseases that can either kill or give lifetime difficulties." Ley said the package was part of a "carrot and stick" approach to immunisation. The government last Sunday said it would block parents who refuse to vaccinate their children from accessing some government benefits.


  • India's bidi workers suffer for 1,000-a-day habit

    Young Indian labourer packs bidis into colourful conical packets and boxes, at the New Sarkar Bidi Factory in Kannauj, some 200 km south-east of New DelhiZainab Begum Alvi and her band of young helpers hunch over baskets filled with tobacco flakes and dried leaves, trying to roll a thousand dirt-cheap cigarettes a day at the behest of India's powerful bidi barons. "There is no other work than this, so if I don't do it, I can't do anything else," added Alvi, a tiny and gaunt woman from the impoverished northern state of Uttar Pradesh who says she is in her 50s. - 'No link to cancer' - Three lawmakers from the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party on a parliamentary committee looking into the issue were widely condemned when they cited a lack of evidence that smoking caused cancer as a reason for stalling the measure. "There is no medical evidence that bidis cause cancer," said Shyama Charan Gupta, one of the three lawmakers on the committee and who heads a company that produces one of the industry's best-selling brands.


  • Bird flu confirmed on second farm in Ontario, Canada
    Preliminary testing has confirmed the presence of H5 avian influenza on a second Ontario farm, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency said on Saturday. Avian influenza is an infectious viral disease of birds. Most bird flu viruses do not infect humans or pose a food safety risk when poultry products are properly handled and cooked. Canadian authorities earlier this month confirmed the presence of H5 avian influenza on a turkey farm near Woodstock, Ontario.
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