KXII Health Headlines

Unapproved device buys time for new pair of lungs

Posted: 07/02/2014 - PITTSBURGH (AP) - An Oklahoma man is slowly gaining strength at a Pittsburgh hospital with a second set of transplanted lungs in a procedure that was possible only through a device that until now hasn't been used in the U.S.

Warning signs and how to prevent a drowning

Updated: 06/19/2014 - DENISON, TX -- As the temperatures rise in Texoma, lifeguards and emergency crews are concerned about an increase in drowning accidents as more people hit the water.

FDA prepping long-awaited plan to reduce salt

Posted: 06/17/2014 - WASHINGTON (AP) - Food companies and restaurants could soon face government pressure to make their foods less salty - a long-awaited federal effort to try to prevent thousands of deaths each year from heart disease and stroke.

Safe Family: BB gun problems

Posted: 05/22/2014 - IOWA -- An Iowa woman is warning parents about the dangers of BB guns. She was hit in the chest and it is now lodged in her body. Vanessa Peng has her story in today's safe family report.
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Kids get codeine in ER despite risks, guidelines

Posted: 04/21/2014 - CHICAGO (AP) - Despite recommended limits on codeine use in children, the potent painkiller is prescribed for children in at least half a million emergency room visits each year, a study suggests.

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  • Obama proposes 'precision medicine' to end one-size-fits-all

    White House press secretary Josh Earnest answers questions about the upcoming budget proposal from President Barack Obama, Thursday, Jan. 29, 2015, during the daily briefing at the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama is calling for an investment to move away from one-size-fits-all-medicine, toward an approach that tailors treatment to your genes.


  • U.S. proposes effort to analyze DNA from 1 million people

    A DNA double helix in an undated artist's illustration released by the National Human Genome Research Institute to ReutersBy Toni Clarke and Sharon Begley WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The United States has proposed analyzing genetic information from more than 1 million American volunteers as part of a new initiative to understand human disease and develop medicines targeted to an individual's genetic make-up. At the heart of the initiative, to be announced on Friday by President Barack Obama, is the creation of a pool of people - healthy and ill, men and women, old and young - who would be studied to learn how genetic variants affect health and disease. The near-term goal is to create more and better treatments for cancer, Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), told reporters on a conference call on Thursday.


  • France delays pesticide reduction goal by 7 years

    Gulls fly near the tractor of a French farmer in a field in Ault near Le TreportFrance, the European Union's biggest agricultural producer, has delayed a target to halve pesticide use to 2025 from 2018 after plans to curb their deployment failed, the farm minister said on Friday. France had set a voluntary target of halving pesticide use in the decade to 2018 but it has in fact risen, partly due to adverse weather conditions. Like the EU as a whole, France has sought to become less dependent on pesticides, which are blamed for posing health and environmental risks. The French government has pushed back to 2025 the timeline for halving pesticide use and added an intermediate target of a 25 percent fall by 2020, Agriculture Minister Stephane Le Foll said in an interview in daily newspaper Liberation.


  • At least 20 killed in explosion at Pakistan Shi'ite mosque
    ISLAMABAD (Reuters) - At least 20 people were killed on Friday when an explosion ripped through a packed Shi'ite mosque in the Pakistani city of Shikarpur, officials said. "At least 20 dead bodies and more than 50 wounded people have been brought to the hospital," Shaukat Memon, a doctor at a nearby hospital, told Reuters. (Reporting by Syed Raza Hassan; Writing by Maria Golovnina; Editing by Clarence Fernandez)
  • Three months on, fruitless CEO search overshadows Sanofi

    A logo is seen in front of the entrance at the headquarters of French drugmaker Sanofi in ParisBarring a last-minute breakthrough, drugs firm Sanofi's Chairman Serge Weinberg may have to acknowledge in his results presentation next week that the hunt for a new chief executive is not going well. The manner of Chris Viehbacher's shock dismissal three months ago, and the surprisingly small pay-off he won last week, have cast a long shadow over the process. Paris-schooled Olivier Bohuon, chief executive of British medical devices maker Smith & Nephew, told staff in November he had no plans to leave, and in the same month, former Wyeth boss Bernard Poussot joined the board of Sanofi's rival Roche. Weinberg, who will be 64 on Feb. 10 and does not have a pharmaceuticals background besides his five years on the board, is running Sanofi himself while board member Jean-Rene Fourtou conducts a search -- one which began well before Viehbacher was fired.


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