KXII Health Headlines

Unapproved device buys time for new pair of lungs

Posted: 07/02/2014 - PITTSBURGH (AP) - An Oklahoma man is slowly gaining strength at a Pittsburgh hospital with a second set of transplanted lungs in a procedure that was possible only through a device that until now hasn't been used in the U.S.

Warning signs and how to prevent a drowning

Updated: 06/19/2014 - DENISON, TX -- As the temperatures rise in Texoma, lifeguards and emergency crews are concerned about an increase in drowning accidents as more people hit the water.

FDA prepping long-awaited plan to reduce salt

Posted: 06/17/2014 - WASHINGTON (AP) - Food companies and restaurants could soon face government pressure to make their foods less salty - a long-awaited federal effort to try to prevent thousands of deaths each year from heart disease and stroke.

Safe Family: BB gun problems

Posted: 05/22/2014 - IOWA -- An Iowa woman is warning parents about the dangers of BB guns. She was hit in the chest and it is now lodged in her body. Vanessa Peng has her story in today's safe family report.
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Kids get codeine in ER despite risks, guidelines

Posted: 04/21/2014 - CHICAGO (AP) - Despite recommended limits on codeine use in children, the potent painkiller is prescribed for children in at least half a million emergency room visits each year, a study suggests.

Health overhaul signup ends, survives for now

Posted: 03/31/2014 - WASHINGTON (AP) - Monday marks the end of the six-month sign-up period for insurance under President Barack Obama's health care overhaul, a highly controversial attempt to reduce the number of Americans without medical coverage, estimated at about 50 million.

Study finds many preteens have high cholesterol

Posted: 03/28/2014 - There's fresh evidence that a lot of young people could be headed for heart trouble. A large study of preteens in Texas found that about one-third of them had borderline or high cholesterol when tested during routine physical exams.

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  • Why isn't there a treatment or vaccine for Ebola?

    FILE - In this Saturday, Sept. 29, 2007, file photo, A 43 year old Congolese patient, center, who has been confirmed to have Ebola hemorrhagic fever, following laboratory tests, is comforted by Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors without Borders) nurse Isabel Grovas, left, and Doctor Hilde Declerck, right, in Kampungu, Kasai Occidental province, Congo. In the four decades since the Ebola virus was first identified in Africa, treatment hasn’t changed much. There are no licensed drugs or vaccines for the deadly disease. A number are being developed, but none have been rigorously tested in humans. One experimental treatment, though, was tried this week in an American aid worker sick with Ebola, according to the U.S-based group that she works for in Liberia. Without a specific treatment, doctors and nurses focus on easing the disease’s symptoms _ fever, headache, vomiting and diarrhea _ and on keeping patients hydrated and comfortable. (AP Photo/WHO, Christopher Black, File)LONDON (AP) — In the four decades since the Ebola virus was first identified in Africa, treatment hasn't changed much. There are no licensed drugs or vaccines for the deadly disease.


  • Americans with Ebola returning to US for treatment

    This Oct. 7, 2013 photo provided by Jeremy Writebol show his mother, Nancy Writebol, with children in Liberia. Writebol is one of two Americans working for a missionary group in Liberia that have been diagnosed with Ebola. Plans are underway to bring back the two Americans from Africa for treatment. (AP Photo/Courtesy Jeremy Writebol)NEW YORK (AP) — Two American aid workers seriously ill with Ebola will be brought from West Africa to Atlanta for treatment in one of the most tightly sealed isolation units in the country, officials said Friday.


  • Colorado panel considers new look for edible pot

    FILE - In this June 19, 2014, file photo, chef Alex Tretter carries a tray of cannabis-infused peanut butter and jelly cups to the oven for baking at Sweet Grass Kitchen, a well-established Denver-based gourmet marijuana edibles bakery which sells its confections to retail outlets throughout the state. Colorado marijuana regulators have drafted an emergency rule aimed at making it easier for new marijuana users to tell how much pot they are eating. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File)GOLDEN, Colo. (AP) — Marijuana can go in more than brownies and cookies. And the dizzying variety of foods that can be infused with the drug is complicating matters for Colorado regulators who want to make sure pot-infused edibles and drinks won't be confused with regular foods.


  • West Africa seeks to seal off Ebola-hit regions
    West Africa's Ebola-hit nations have agreed to impose a cross-border isolation zone at the epicentre of the world's worst-ever outbreak, amid warnings that the deadly epidemic is spiralling out of control. The announcement came at an emergency summit in the Guinean capital on Friday to discuss the outbreak, which has killed more than 700 people, with the World Health Organization warning Ebola could cause "catastrophic" loss of life and severe economic disruption if it continued to spread. "We have agreed to take important and extraordinary actions at the inter-country level to focus on cross-border regions that have more than 70 percent of the epidemic," said Hadja Saran Darab, the secretary-general of the Mano River Union bloc grouping the nations. Opening the summit, WHO chief Margaret Chan told leaders that the response of the three countries to the epidemic had been "woefully inadequate", revealing that the outbreak was "moving faster than our efforts to control it".
  • U.S. FDA says 'stands ready' to work with companies developing Ebola drugs
    By Julie Steenhuysen CHICAGO (Reuters) - The worst Ebola outbreak in history is heaping new pressure on U.S. regulators to speed the development of treatments for the deadly virus, which has killed more than 700 people since February. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday said in an emailed statement the agency "stands ready" to work with companies and investigators working with patients "in dire need of treatment." A senior official within FDA told Reuters the agency would consider proposals for providing treatments under special emergency new drug applications, if the benefits of the treatment outweighed the potential safety risks. FDA's statement follow calls by doctors fed up by the lack of progress on Ebola treatments, a market deemed too small to gain much attention by large pharmaceutical companies. Earlier this month, the agency put a hold on a Tekmira Pharmaceuticals Corp clinical trial of TKM-Ebola, one of the few Ebola treatments advanced enough to be tested in people.
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