Health

Unapproved device buys time for new pair of lungs


Colder weather brings residential health hazards


Dentist gives back through gift of dental care


Denison toddler fights life-threatening disease


Cell phones believed to cause serious sleep problems


Local vet responds to viral "No Ice Water For Dogs" blog post


Warning signs and how to prevent a drowning


FDA prepping long-awaited plan to reduce salt


Kids get codeine in ER despite risks, guidelines


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CBS News Health Headlines

A new treatment for opioid addicts -- using implants -- should be available by the end of next month; for some addicts the treatment seems promising
Addiction to opiods including painkillers and heroin claims nearly 29,000 American lives each year
Spending time walking and grooming the animals helps bring a sense of peace, vets say
Parents must stay vigilant around any swimming area, experts say

WebMD Health News

Rodents exposed to phone radiation actually lived longer than unexposed animals, reviewers point out

Scientists measured evidence of exposure in the womb and found an association, but not proof

Insect Repellent

Mosquito repellents are safe, so you should use them. And there are more choices than ever. WebMD breaks down your options.

Researchers find the virus can replicate in immune cells

Pennsylvania case suggests it's almost 'the end of the road' for these drugs

AP Top Health Stories

Mexico's striker Alan Pulido is seen next to Tamaulipas State Governor Egidio Torre Cantu after Pulido has been rescued within a day in Ciudad VictoriaBy Natalie Ann Schachar MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - The authorities billed it as a rescue, but Mexican soccer player Alan Pulido escaped his kidnappers by punching the one guarding him, snatching a cellphone and calling for help, a top official in the country's violent northeast said on Monday. State security forces located Pulido within minutes of his call from a safe house in the restive city of Ciudad Victoria in Tamaulipas state, as they were scouring the area nearby, state prosecutor Ismael Quintanilla told local radio. The 25-year-old Mexico national team striker who also plays professionally with the Greek team Olympiakos disappeared in his hometown on Saturday night, when he was intercepted by gunmen after leaving a party with his girlfriend.


By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Heath) - People may do a better job of following doctors' orders to take statin drugs - prescribed to protect against cardiac problems - after they wind up hospitalized for a heart attack, a large study suggests. "Our theory is that the heart attack hospitalization appeared to serve as a teachable moment, or a wake-up call, to patients to do everything possible to prevent another heart attack," lead study author Dr. Ian Kronish of Columbia University Medical Center said by email. Millions of people worldwide take statins to help reduce their blood levels of low-density lipoprotein, or LDL, cholesterol – the bad kind that builds up in blood vessels, damages artery walls and can lead to clots and heart attacks.
By Anthony Esposito SANTIAGO (Reuters) - An unusually widespread and deadly "red tide" outbreak in southern Chile's fishing-rich waters is abating, a top scientist said on Monday, giving some reprieve to communities that depend on the Pacific Ocean for their livelihoods. The red tide - an algal bloom that turns the sea water red and makes seafood toxic - is a common, naturally recurring phenomenon in southern Chile. "From the first analysis of the samples taken from the ocean around Chiloe island, we can conclude that the red tide phenomenon is receding," University of Concepcion investigator Laura Farias told reporters on a conference call.
ELOY, Ariz. (AP) — An outbreak of measles that began with an inmate at a federal detention center for immigrants in central Arizona has now grown to 11 confirmed cases, officials said Monday.

A Brazilian Army soldier shows pamphlets during the National Day of Mobilization Zika Zero in Rio de JaneiroBy Stephanie Nebehay GENEVA (Reuters) - Postponing the Rio Olympics due to fears that the event could speed the spread of the Zika virus would give a "false" sense of security because travelers are constantly going in and out of Brazil, the head of the World Health Organization's emergency committee said. More than 100 medical experts and scientists called last Friday for the Rio Games to be postponed or moved due to fears over the spread of the virus, which is linked to serious birth defects.. The WHO rejected their call. Extensive travel in a globalized world is the issue, not the Games that start on August 5, said David Heymann, chair of the Health Protection Agency in Britain who also leads the WHO panel of independent experts on Zika.