KXII Health Headlines

Unapproved device buys time for new pair of lungs

Posted: 07/02/2014 - PITTSBURGH (AP) - An Oklahoma man is slowly gaining strength at a Pittsburgh hospital with a second set of transplanted lungs in a procedure that was possible only through a device that until now hasn't been used in the U.S.

Warning signs and how to prevent a drowning

Updated: 06/19/2014 - DENISON, TX -- As the temperatures rise in Texoma, lifeguards and emergency crews are concerned about an increase in drowning accidents as more people hit the water.

FDA prepping long-awaited plan to reduce salt

Posted: 06/17/2014 - WASHINGTON (AP) - Food companies and restaurants could soon face government pressure to make their foods less salty - a long-awaited federal effort to try to prevent thousands of deaths each year from heart disease and stroke.

Safe Family: BB gun problems

Posted: 05/22/2014 - IOWA -- An Iowa woman is warning parents about the dangers of BB guns. She was hit in the chest and it is now lodged in her body. Vanessa Peng has her story in today's safe family report.
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Kids get codeine in ER despite risks, guidelines

Posted: 04/21/2014 - CHICAGO (AP) - Despite recommended limits on codeine use in children, the potent painkiller is prescribed for children in at least half a million emergency room visits each year, a study suggests.

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  • British health worker being tested for Ebola after needle injury

    Suspected carrier of Ebola virus James Flomo sits in isolation with his children after his wife Lorpu Flomo died three days earlier in MonroviaA British military healthcare worker was flown back to England from Sierra Leone on Saturday following a needle-stick injury sustained while treating a person with Ebola, the Public Health England (PHE) service said on Saturday. The patient, who has not been named, has been taken for testing to the Royal Free Hospital in London. "They are likely to have been exposed to the Ebola virus but, at this time, have not been diagnosed with Ebola and do not have symptoms," PHE said in a statement. The Royal Free, Britain's main center for Ebola cases, also successfully treated British aid worker William Pooley who contracted the virus in West Africa last year.


  • GMO mosquito plan sparks outcry in Florida

    A British company's plan to unleash hordes of genetically modified mosquitoes in Florida to reduce the threat of dengue fever and other diseases has sparked an outcry from fearful residentsA British company's plan to unleash hordes of genetically modified mosquitoes in Florida to reduce the threat of dengue fever and other diseases has sparked an outcry from fearful residents. The company, Oxitec, said it wants to try the technique there in order to reduce the non-native Aedes aegypti mosquitoes in south Florida and beyond. "They are more than just a nuisance as they can spread serious diseases such as dengue fever and chikungunya," Oxitec said on its website. The process involves inserting a gene into lab-grown, male Aedes aegypti mosquitoes.


  • Africa looks to extend new disaster insurance to Ebola-like epidemics

    Health workers carry the body of a suspected Ebola victim for burial at a cemetery in FreetownBy Daniel Flynn DAKAR (Reuters) - African countries want to extend a new catastrophe insurance fund, which made its first payout of $25 million this month, to include protection against epidemics in the wake of the devastating Ebola outbreak. The African Risk Capacity (ARC) agency, a specialised body of the African Union, launched a scheme last year to insure against natural disasters. It is an effort to break Africa's reliance on foreign aid and address the impact of climate change by using innovative financial techniques. The ARC paid $25 million in its first year of operations to Senegal, Mauritania and Niger to mitigate the effects of a severe drought in the arid Sahel region south of the Sahara -- well above the $8 million in premiums paid by those countries.


  • Liberia delays school reopening by two weeks as Ebola cases fall

    RNPS: YEAREND REVIEW 2014 - HEADLINE MAKERSLiberia said on Friday it would delay reopening schools for two weeks in order to better prepare safety measures against the Ebola virus, which has killed more than 3,650 people in the country but now appears to be receding. A ministry statement said it wanted to "raise awareness about safety protocols, logistics and training requirements", adding: "Actual teaching will begin on Monday, Feb. 16, 2015." Some Liberian opposition parties and members of parliament had called for the reopening date to be moved to March 2, concerned that the Ebola epidemic is not yet fully under control. Liberia and its neighbours Sierra Leone and Guinea have been hardest hit in the worst outbreak of the viral haemorrhagic fever on record. The number of Ebola infections and deaths has fallen sharply in Liberia and Sierra Leone in the past few weeks, with just 20 deaths recorded in Liberia in the 21 days to Jan. 25, according to the World Health Organisation, raising hopes that the disease is gradually being brought under control.


  • Second patient hospitalized in California undergoes Ebola testing
    Hours after a suspected Ebola patient in Sacramento, California, was found to be free of the virus, a second person hospitalized in the city was reported by public health officials on Friday to be undergoing testing for the deadly disease. The second patient was admitted to Kaiser Permanente South Sacramento Medical Center on Wednesday and, like the previous case, is considered to be at low risk of having contracted the virus, the hospital said in a statement.
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