Health

Tips on using mosquito repellent


Lone Grove residents should be receiving clear water


Tips on sunscreen during summer heat


Annual KXII All-American Blood Drives kickoff


Cooke County hosting seminar about mosquito disease


Health Department officials warn of Syphilis in Grayson County


Graco recalls car seats; webbing may not hold child in crash


Frito-Lay announce recall of select Jalapeno flavored potato chips


Health department talks about rodent viral video


More than half a million asthma inhalers recalled by GSK


Conagra recalls Hunt's chili kits; may contain salmonella


12 million enroll in health law that Trump, GOP are trying to repeal


Congress' analyst: 14 million lose coverage under GOP health bill


GOP health bill clears first hurdles; leaders claim momentum


Bird flu found at Tyson Foods chicken supplier


Denison 16-month-old infected with malaria


Games, crafts, other activities may safeguard aging brain


Texoma Health Foundation teams up to launch 'Okay to Say' initiative


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CBS News Health Headlines

The Hippocratic Oath advises doctors to first DO NO HARM - so imagine intentionally using a virus that causes paralysis in hopes of treating the deadliest form of brain cancer. That's what doctors are trying with some patients with glioblastoma, the same cancer Arizona Senator John McCain is now grappling with, by using a reengineered polio virus. Dr. Jon LaPook reports.
A vaccine exists that can actually prevent cancer, yet millions of people are not taking it. Dr. Tara Narula reports on how immunization against the human papillomavirus (or HPV) can prevent many cancers, but only two-thirds of girls and one-half of boys have received the vaccine.
Can what you eat make a difference in preventing cancer, or in aiding cancer treatment itself? Correspondent Martha Teichner talks with Dr. Margaret Cuomo, dietician Mary-Eve Brown, chef Eric Levine, and patients undergoing chemotherapy about the relationship between diet and disease. Originally broadcast on March 12, 2017.
Some women who have lost breasts to cancer have chosen to deal with their loss in a fashion that is sparking conversations, and controversy. They call it "going flat." Instead of reconstructing their bodies with surgical implants, they are embracing their scars, and even baring them in defiance of the disease. Erin Moriarty of "48 Hours" reports.

WebMD Health News

High-sugar drinks combined with protein triggers extra fat storage by body, study finds

New Jersey is the mentally healthiest state, report finds

Scientists studying ancient predators for possible human benefit

syphilis

Rates of congenital syphilis are on the rise after years of decline.

Early menstruation, more frequent periods seem to make sad times less likely, researchers suggest

AP Top Health Stories

How to Stay Safe in the HeatWith summer in full swing, you’re probably outside more than usual. And chances are it feels hot out there, particularly when you’re exerting yourself. Most of the time, your body is quite good a...


How to Stay Safe in the HeatWith summer in full swing, you’re probably outside more than usual. And chances are it feels hot out there, particularly when you’re exerting yourself. Most of the time, your body is quite good a...


Protect Yourself Against C. Diff InfectionsAntibiotics treat infections, but surprisingly, they can cause them too. In fact, a new study finds that the number of virulent infections linked to the use of antibiotics has skyrocketed. The st...


Protect Yourself Against C. Diff InfectionsAntibiotics treat infections, but surprisingly, they can cause them too. In fact, a new study finds that the number of virulent infections linked to the use of antibiotics has skyrocketed. The st...


How to Exercise for Brain HealthYou have many good reasons to become more physically active: Doing so can boost mood, help maintain a healthy weight, and keep muscles strong. Now a growing body of evidence suggests that workout...