Health

Pilot Point spraying for mosquitoes after confirmed Zika case


More Grayson County test pools positive for West Nile virus


U.S. government won't reclassify marijuana, allows research


City of Ada keeps ambulances running


Medicare releases hospital ratings


Mosquitoes carrying West Nile Virus reported in Grayson County


Carter County Interim Sheriff Named


To spray or not to spray


TMC Medical Minutes: Gastric Bypass Surgery


Colder weather brings residential health hazards


Dentist gives back through gift of dental care


Denison toddler fights life-threatening disease


Unapproved device buys time for new pair of lungs


Cell phones believed to cause serious sleep problems


Local vet responds to viral "No Ice Water For Dogs" blog post


Warning signs and how to prevent a drowning


FDA prepping long-awaited plan to reduce salt


Kids get codeine in ER despite risks, guidelines


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CBS News Health Headlines

Opioids are “one of our greatest public health threats and it’s one that we have to respond to with speed and with urgency,” says U.S. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy
Surgeon General Vivek Murthy calls America's opioid epidemic the health crisis of our generation. It causes more than 1,000 emergency room visits and kills 78 people every day. This week, Dr. Murthy is taking the unprecedented step of mailing letters to the 2.3 million prescribers in America. First on "CBS This Morning," Dr. Murthy shows how he wants clinicians to help in the fight.
Does your child need help getting in shape? A leading physicians group has some advice
Here are some tips for allergy sufferers who need these potential life-savers even as the price soars

WebMD Health News

International committee finds thinner folks less likely to develop variety of malignancies

But shared risk factors, such as air pollution, might explain the connection, researchers say

Female heart disease patients under 50 were 4 times more likely than male peers to show effects, study found

Monitoring is essential, especially later in pregnancy, study suggests

Brazilian infant appeared outwardly fine at birth, but neurological troubles arose later

AP Top Health Stories

FILE - This March 28, 2012 file photo shows Janis Haddon,of Atlanta, holding a glove with a message outside the Supreme Court in Washington as the court concluded three days of hearing arguments on the constitutionality of President Barack Obama's health care overhaul. America’s health care system is unsustainable. It’s not one problem, but three combined: high cost, uneven quality and millions uninsured. Major changes will keep coming. Every family will be affected. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)The issue:


EpiPen auto-injection epinephrine pens manufactured by Mylan NV pharmaceutical company are seen in WashingtonThe company, which did not lower the drug's list price, said it would reduce the patient cost of EpiPen through the use of a savings card, which will cover up to $300 of EpiPen 2-Pak. For patients previously paying the full list price, the card effectively reduces their out-of-pocket cost exposure by 50 percent, Mylan said. Clinton on Wednesday called on Mylan to voluntarily drop EpiPen's price.


ST. LOUIS (AP) — The nonprofit Catholic organization SSM Health says it will provide birth control pills at 26 clinics inside St. Louis-area Walgreens stores that it began operating Thursday.
HONG KONG (Reuters) - Hong Kong confirmed its first imported case of Zika at a news conference late on Thursday. Government-funded broadcaster RTHK said the infected person was a foreign woman in her 30s believed to have caught the virus in the Caribbean. Zika is a borne by mosquitoes. The virus poses a risk to pregnant women and has been linked to more than 1,800 cases of microcephaly in Brazil, and to auto-immune disorder Guillain–Barre syndrome, which can cause paralysis. (Reporting by Twinnie Siu, Meg Shen and Clare Baldwin; editing by John Stonestreet)

India has the highest number of TB cases in the world, accounting for around a quarter of cases worldwideMore than a million tuberculosis cases may be missing from official statistics in India, the country worst affected by the deadly bacterial infection, a study published in The Lancet journal Thursday found. Many patients seeking treatment for TB turn to unregulated private doctors who often do not report cases, say researchers from Imperial College London, India's national TB programme and the World Health Organisation (WHO). Official estimates put the number of TB cases treated in the Indian private sector in 2014 at around 800,000, but researchers' analysis of drugs sales suggests the figure could exceed two million.