KXII Health Headlines

Unapproved device buys time for new pair of lungs

Posted: 07/02/2014 - PITTSBURGH (AP) - An Oklahoma man is slowly gaining strength at a Pittsburgh hospital with a second set of transplanted lungs in a procedure that was possible only through a device that until now hasn't been used in the U.S.

Warning signs and how to prevent a drowning

Updated: 06/19/2014 - DENISON, TX -- As the temperatures rise in Texoma, lifeguards and emergency crews are concerned about an increase in drowning accidents as more people hit the water.

FDA prepping long-awaited plan to reduce salt

Posted: 06/17/2014 - WASHINGTON (AP) - Food companies and restaurants could soon face government pressure to make their foods less salty - a long-awaited federal effort to try to prevent thousands of deaths each year from heart disease and stroke.

Safe Family: BB gun problems

Posted: 05/22/2014 - IOWA -- An Iowa woman is warning parents about the dangers of BB guns. She was hit in the chest and it is now lodged in her body. Vanessa Peng has her story in today's safe family report.
Video

Kids get codeine in ER despite risks, guidelines

Posted: 04/21/2014 - CHICAGO (AP) - Despite recommended limits on codeine use in children, the potent painkiller is prescribed for children in at least half a million emergency room visits each year, a study suggests.

More KXII Health Headlines

CBS News Health Headlines

WebMD Health News

AP Top Health Stories

  • Second Los Angeles hospital reports 'superbug' infections

    FILE - This undated file photo provided by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration shows the tip of an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) duodenoscope, attached to a long tube, not shown. Cedars-Sinai Medical Center said on Wednesday, March 4, 2015, that four patients have been infected with a superbug linked to a contaminated medical scope. It’s the second Los Angeles hospital to report infections from a superbug known as CRE. (AP Photo/U.S. Food and Drug Administration, File)LOS ANGELES (AP) — Four patients at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center have been infected with an antibiotic-resistant "superbug" linked to a type of medical scope that's used on more than a half-million people in the U.S. every year, the hospital said Wednesday.


  • McDonald's antibiotic-free move could prompt U.S. chicken squeeze
    A plan by McDonald's Corp to phase out chicken raised with certain kinds of antibiotics at its 14,000 U.S. restaurants will put additional pressure on an already-stressed supply chain. Antibiotic-free chicken currently accounts for a tiny portion of total U.S. supplies, and an increasing desire on the part of consumers for more "natural" products has meant that demand sometimes exceeds supply. Available product has been so tight that when six of the largest U.S. school districts tried to make the switch to antibiotic-free poultry last year, chicken sellers such as Tyson Foods Inc and Pilgrim's Pride Corp said they could not change their production systems quickly enough to meet the demand. "This is very likely to cause a disruption in McDonald's food supply and will likely raise operating costs for McDonald's franchisees," added Richard Adams, a former McDonald's franchisee who now runs the consulting firm Franchise Equity Group.
  • U.S. FDA updates safety alert for 'superbug' scopes
    U.S. health regulators issued an updated safety alert on Wednesday for endoscopes linked to drug-resistant "superbug" bacteria in California hospitals. The Food and Drug Administration said it was not recommending that healthcare providers cancel procedures performed with a duodenoscope for patients who need them. It did recommend that healthcare providers inform patients of the risks, including infection, and benefits associated with the procedure and report to the manufacturer and the FDA if they suspect problems with the equipment have led to patient infections. The alert followed news on Wednesday that four patients at the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles were infected with a drug-resistant bacteria during endoscopic procedures that may have exposed 64 others since August.
  • U.S. Supreme Court split over Obamacare challenge

    Members of the King v. Burwell plaintiffs' legal team, including Kazman, Pruitt, Pamela and Douglas Hurst, and Carvin, exit the Supreme Court building after arguments in WashingtonBy Lawrence Hurley WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Supreme Court appeared sharply divided on ideological lines on Wednesday as it tackled a second major challenge to President Barack Obama's healthcare law, with Justice Anthony Kennedy emerging as a likely swing vote in a ruling. The nine justices heard 85 minutes of arguments in the case brought by conservative opponents of the law who contend its tax credits aimed at helping people afford medical insurance should not be available in most states. A ruling favoring the challengers could cripple the law dubbed Obamacare, the president's signature domestic policy achievement. Kennedy, a conservative who often casts the deciding vote in close cases, raised concerns to lawyers on both sides about the possible negative impact on states if the government loses the case, suggesting he could back the Obama administration.


  • U.S. high court's Kennedy criticizes challenge to Obamacare subsidies
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Justice Anthony Kennedy, a possible swing vote on a closely divided U.S. Supreme Court, told a lawyer challenging Obamacare subsidies on Wednesday that his argument raised a serious constitutional problem, but said the lawyer might win anyway on other grounds. Justice Anthony Kennedy questioned lawyer Michael Carvin part way into the scheduled one-hour oral argument about how a ruling might unlawfully pressure states in a case that tests President Barack Obama's signature domestic policy achievement. (Reporting by David Ingram; Editing by Will Dunham)
Sherman 4201 Texoma Pkwy (903) 892 -8123 Ardmore 2624 S. Commerce (580) 223-0946
Copyright © 2002-2015 - Designed by Gray Digital Media - Powered by Clickability
Gray Television, Inc.