KXII Health Headlines

Unapproved device buys time for new pair of lungs

Posted: 07/02/2014 - PITTSBURGH (AP) - An Oklahoma man is slowly gaining strength at a Pittsburgh hospital with a second set of transplanted lungs in a procedure that was possible only through a device that until now hasn't been used in the U.S.

Warning signs and how to prevent a drowning

Updated: 06/19/2014 - DENISON, TX -- As the temperatures rise in Texoma, lifeguards and emergency crews are concerned about an increase in drowning accidents as more people hit the water.

FDA prepping long-awaited plan to reduce salt

Posted: 06/17/2014 - WASHINGTON (AP) - Food companies and restaurants could soon face government pressure to make their foods less salty - a long-awaited federal effort to try to prevent thousands of deaths each year from heart disease and stroke.

Safe Family: BB gun problems

Posted: 05/22/2014 - IOWA -- An Iowa woman is warning parents about the dangers of BB guns. She was hit in the chest and it is now lodged in her body. Vanessa Peng has her story in today's safe family report.
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Kids get codeine in ER despite risks, guidelines

Posted: 04/21/2014 - CHICAGO (AP) - Despite recommended limits on codeine use in children, the potent painkiller is prescribed for children in at least half a million emergency room visits each year, a study suggests.

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  • Gut check: how vultures dine on rotting flesh, and like it

    File of vultures feasting on a road kill as commuters pass by real estate for sale in Great FallsBy Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - They snack on danger and dine on death, merrily munching on rotting flesh that would certainly sicken or kill any person and most other animals. But how do vultures do it? These feathery scavengers have one of the toughest guts on the planet, that is how. Scientists said on Tuesday that their analysis of two species of North American vultures showed that the birds possess a ferociously acidic digestive system and intestines loaded with two fiendish kinds of bacteria. ...


  • Under pressure, U.S. EPA seeks tighter ozone standards
    By Valerie Volcovici WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is proposing more stringent air quality standards for ground-level ozone, the main culprit in smog, the agency's chief said on Wednesday. Under deadline to release its proposal by Monday, the agency said it will seek a National Ambient Air Quality Standard between 65 and 70 parts per billion concentration of ozone, and take comment on standards within a 60-75 ppb range, EPA administrator Gina McCarthy said. Current standards, set under then-President George W. Bush in 2008, are set at 75 ppb. ...
  • Cricket-Australia's Hughes continues to fight for life
    * Batsman's condition remains critical after scans * Domestic cricket matches called off as mark of respect (Adds details, quotes) SYDNEY, Nov 26 (Reuters) - Australia cricketer Phil Hughes was still fighting for his life on Wednesday as family and friends kept vigil at his hospital bedside. Hughes remains in an induced coma after undergoing emergency surgery on Tuesday when he was struck in the head by a bouncer, a devastating blow that experts likened to the trauma experienced by car crash victims. ...
  • Cricket-Hughes blow takes Chatfield back to 1970s blackout
    By Ian Ransom MELBOURNE, Nov 26 (Reuters) - Phillip Hughes' fight for survival from a severe head injury has prompted a wave of sympathy across the globe, not least from former New Zealand cricketer Ewen Chatfield, who was nearly killed by a fast delivery in the 1970s. Chatfield played 43 tests, ending his international career in 1989, but his debut against England 14 years earlier remains memorable for all the wrong reasons. ...
  • Kenyan women pay the price for slum water "mafias"

    A woman washes her clothes by a wall with various campaign posters in the Kibera slum in NairobiBy Katy Migiro and Magdalena Mis NAIROBI/LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Rising before dawn, the women emerged from their ramshackle shacks and squelched through the mud to stand in line for water in Kibera, Nairobi's biggest slum. Seven hours later, bullet-grey skies drizzled on and off, but the women stuck by their yellow jerrycans in the glutinous mud, awaiting their turn at the precious water tap. "Water is life," said Judith Makhoha, a mother of three, who was buying 200 litres of water to do her laundry. "You can't live without water. ...


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