KXII Health Headlines

Unapproved device buys time for new pair of lungs

Posted: 07/02/2014 - PITTSBURGH (AP) - An Oklahoma man is slowly gaining strength at a Pittsburgh hospital with a second set of transplanted lungs in a procedure that was possible only through a device that until now hasn't been used in the U.S.

Warning signs and how to prevent a drowning

Updated: 06/19/2014 - DENISON, TX -- As the temperatures rise in Texoma, lifeguards and emergency crews are concerned about an increase in drowning accidents as more people hit the water.

FDA prepping long-awaited plan to reduce salt

Posted: 06/17/2014 - WASHINGTON (AP) - Food companies and restaurants could soon face government pressure to make their foods less salty - a long-awaited federal effort to try to prevent thousands of deaths each year from heart disease and stroke.

Safe Family: BB gun problems

Posted: 05/22/2014 - IOWA -- An Iowa woman is warning parents about the dangers of BB guns. She was hit in the chest and it is now lodged in her body. Vanessa Peng has her story in today's safe family report.
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Kids get codeine in ER despite risks, guidelines

Posted: 04/21/2014 - CHICAGO (AP) - Despite recommended limits on codeine use in children, the potent painkiller is prescribed for children in at least half a million emergency room visits each year, a study suggests.

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  • Mylan to buy Swedish drugmaker Meda in $7.2 billion deal

    A pharmacy employee looks for medication as she works to fill a prescription while working at a pharmacy in New YorkGeneric drugmaker Mylan NV said it would buy Meda AB in a $7.2 billion cash-and-stock deal in its third attempt to buy the Swedish company. The move comes three months after Mylan ditched its seven-month long pursuit of smaller rival Perrigo . Shares of Mylan fell 8 pct in after-hours trading after announcing the offer of 165 Swedish crowns per share.


  • Study finds Zika virus in fetal brain, a clue in outbreak

    CDC Director Tom Frieden testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2016, before the House Foreign Affairs, Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights, and International Organizations subcommittee and Western Hemisphere subcommittee hearing on: 'The Global Zika Epidemic.' (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)WASHINGTON (AP) — New details about the possible effects of the Zika virus on the fetal brain emerged Wednesday as U.S. health officials say mosquito eradication here and abroad is key to protect pregnant women until they can develop a vaccine.


  • White House says opposes House bill on restaurant calories

    Tracy Duve serves nachos at Tony's I-75 Restaurant in Birch RunThe White House said on Wednesday it opposes a bill from the U.S. House of Representatives that it said would undercut regulations aimed at requiring fast food and chain restaurants to disclose the calories in food they sell. The menu regulations, finalized by the Food and Drug Administration in 2014, require calories to be listed on menus and menu boards of certain chain restaurants with 20 or more locations, and on certain vending machines.


  • WHO advises women on Zika protection but no travel advisories

    Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are seen inside the IAEA laboratory in SeibersdorfBy Stephanie Nebehay and Kate Kelland GENEVA/LONDON (Reuters) - The World Health Organisation advised women on Wednesday on how to protect themselves from Zika, particularly if pregnant, but also reassured them that most women in areas affected by the mosquito-borne virus will give birth to "normal infants." The illness, until recently viewed as relatively mild, has sparked concern because of a possible link between infection in pregnancy and microcephaly, a rare birth defect in which infants are born with abnormally small heads that can be accompanied by developmental problems. Brazil, the worst hit country in an outbreak sweeping the Americas and now present in more than 30 countries, is investigating a potential link between Zika infections and more than 4,000 suspected cases of microcephaly.


  • House passes bill requiring EPA actions on lead-laced water

    Flint Mayor Weaver awaits to testify before the House Democratic Steering and Policy Committee on the Flint, Michigan lead water crisis in WashingtonThe U.S. House of Representatives on Wednesday easily passed a bill requiring federal environmental regulators to act faster when lead contamination is found in drinking water. It was crafted by Michigan Representatives Dan Kildee, a Democrat, and Fred Upton, a Republican, in the wake of Flint's drinking water crisis. The measure requires the Environmental Protection Agency to notify the public when concentrations of lead in drinking water rise above mandated levels and to create a plan to improve communication between the agency, utilities, states, and consumers.


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