Health

Unapproved device buys time for new pair of lungs


Colder weather brings residential health hazards


Dentist gives back through gift of dental care


Denison toddler fights life-threatening disease


Cell phones believed to cause serious sleep problems


Local vet responds to viral "No Ice Water For Dogs" blog post


Warning signs and how to prevent a drowning


FDA prepping long-awaited plan to reduce salt


Kids get codeine in ER despite risks, guidelines


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CBS News Health Headlines

Current guidelines suggest starting routine screening for colon cancer at age 50; but new study finds rates increasing among those under 50
A new study finds colon cancer rates are declining overall, but among American's under 50 years old - a group not normally considered at risk - the rates are increasing
"Everybody has a different flaw, and it's just -- why won't you accept me for me?" 12-year-old Trevor Harris says in PSA
Trevor Harris has Tourette syndrome. It's a neurological disorder that causes uncontrollable movements and outbursts called tics. The 12-year-old student is using his tics to teach lessons to his peers and spearhead an anti-bullying campaign.

WebMD Health News

Rodents exposed to phone radiation actually lived longer than unexposed animals, reviewers point out

Scientists measured evidence of exposure in the womb and found an association, but not proof

Insect Repellent

Mosquito repellents are safe, so you should use them. And there are more choices than ever. WebMD breaks down your options.

Researchers find the virus can replicate in immune cells

Pennsylvania case suggests it's almost 'the end of the road' for these drugs

AP Top Health Stories

In this Sunday, April 24, 2016 photo, Dr. Liu Jiaen, center, watches his staff member work on a laboratory dish during an infertility treatment through in vitro fertilization (IVF) for a patient at a hospital in Beijing. China’s decision to allow all married couples to have two children is driving a surge in demand for fertility treatment among older women, putting heavy pressure on clinics and breaking down past sensitivities, and even shame, about the issue. The rise in IVF points to the deferred dreams of many parents who long wanted a second child, but were prevented by a strict population control policy in place for more than 30 years. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)BEIJING (AP) — China's decision to allow all married couples to have two children is driving a surge in demand for fertility treatment among older women, putting heavy pressure on clinics and breaking down past sensitivities, and even shame, about the issue.


Extending Your Healthy LifespanAt Human Longevity Inc. (HLI), our goal is to extend the healthy human lifespan and to revolutionize healthcare.You've often heard me speak about how converging exponential technologies have the potential to disrupt industries. This is a blog providing a detailed overview of the road map for reinventing medicine and extending your "healthy,...


A child's glasses and a jacket lie on a rock in the Park Monceau, after a lightning strike in Paris, Saturday, May 28, 2016. A Paris fire service spokesman says 11 people including eight children have been hit by lightning in a Paris park after a sudden spring storm overtook a child's birthday party. The victims had sought shelter Saturday under a tree at Park Monceau, a popular weekend hangout for well-to-do families in Paris. (AP Photo/Mstyslav Chernov)PARIS (AP) — A child remains in critical condition after a lightning bolt disrupted a birthday party in a Paris park, injuring several.


Class of 2016,Congratulations! And welcome to the rest of your historically long lives. It's worth reflecting on a semantic point for a moment: there's a reason this is called a "commencement address." The word commencement means the beginning, not the end. Never before has this been more poignant than it is today. So, here you sit, adorned in...

This 2006 colorized scanning electron micrograph image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows the O157:H7 strain of the E. coli bacteria. On Wednesday, May 26, 2016, U.S. military officials reported the first U.S. human case of bacteria resistant to an antibiotic used as a last resort drug. The 49-year-old woman has recovered from an infection of E. coli resistant to colistin. But officials fear that if the resistance spreads to other bacteria, the country may soon see germs impervious to all antibiotics. (Janice Carr/CDC via AP)By Bill Berkrot NEW YORK (Reuters) - Drugmakers are renewing efforts to develop medicines to fight emerging antibiotic-resistant bacteria, but creating new classes of drugs on the scale needed is unlikely to happen without new financial incentives to make the effort worth the investment, companies and industry experts said. "The return on investment based on the current commercial model is not really commensurate with the amount of effort you have to put into it," said David Payne, who heads GlaxoSmithKline PLC's antibiotics drug group. Other pharmaceutical companies expressed a similar sentiment.