Health

To spray or not to spray


TMC Medical Minutes: Gastric Bypass Surgery


Colder weather brings residential health hazards


Dentist gives back through gift of dental care


Denison toddler fights life-threatening disease


Unapproved device buys time for new pair of lungs


Cell phones believed to cause serious sleep problems


Local vet responds to viral "No Ice Water For Dogs" blog post


Warning signs and how to prevent a drowning


FDA prepping long-awaited plan to reduce salt


Kids get codeine in ER despite risks, guidelines


Load More Stories
 

CBS News Health Headlines

Do the popular products really kill 99.99 percent of illness-causing germs?
The vice president is bringing together hundreds of scientists, health care providers, patients and their families for a summit in Washington
Are you a mosquito magnet? Here's why some people get bitten more than others, and how to stop it
A new study compares parents and couples without kids in 22 industrialized countries

WebMD Health News

But further research needed to see if injections into spine would provide any benefit, researchers say

Gel hormone treatment led to improved libido and sexual function, study finds

joe biden at cancer moonshot summit

Vice President Joe Biden challenged American researchers Wednesday to cram 10 years of work against cancer into 5 years by boosting clinical trials, enlisting big data, and making life-saving drugs cheaper.

There are no shortages of candles, sprays, and oils to keep mosquitoes away. But WebMD asks which ones really work?

surgeon

What are your surgical options for sleep apnea? WebMD explains.

AP Top Health Stories

By Paula Dear BANGUI (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - When violence erupted in the Central African Republic three years ago, hundreds of thousands of people fled the capital Bangui, including most doctors and medical students at the main children's hospital. As the city descended into chaos, 58-year-old Jean Gody was one of the few doctors who chose to stay behind and help. "I would have been ashamed to leave people suffering and then have to come back and look them in the eyes," the hospital director told the Thomson Reuters Foundation in an interview.
By Paula Dear BANGUI (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Clinging to her toy dog, 18-month-old Clemence Mokbem stares ahead as nurses rush past to tend to crying babies in the hot, overcrowded intensive care ward in a Bangui hospital. The toddler was taken to the main children's hospital in Central African Republic's capital by her teenage mother Anita, after successive bouts of malaria led to fever and weight loss. "I fed her but she didn't eat - she cried all night," the 16-year-old told the Thomson Reuters Foundation at the hospital.

In this photo taken June 22, 2016, a pile of tires sits in a neighborhood near downtown Houston. Trash piles like this are textbook habitat for the mosquitoes that carry Zika, and one example of the challenge facing public health officials. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)HOUSTON (AP) — The poorest parts of Houston remind Dr. Peter Hotez of some of the neighborhoods in Latin America hardest hit by Zika.


Finding A Cure Wouldn’t Mean We’ve Defeated CancerWebMD wasn't a research option when Ivy Brown was diagnosed with Hodgkin's lymphoma in 1974, so her mother looked up her 12-year-old daughter's condition the old-fashioned way, in a hardcover medical volume."It just said 'fatal,'" Brown explained. Having moved the family to London a month earlier, Brown's parents were still trying to liaise...


The mosquito-borne Zika virus has been linked to microcephaly -- a shrinking of the brain and skull -- in babiesSome infants with brain abnormalities may not be diagnosed because they have normal-sized heads instead of the tell-tale small skulls of those born with Zika-linked microcephaly, said one of the papers published by The Lancet. This meant that "newborns infected with the virus late in pregnancy may go unreported due to their head size being within normal range," said study co-author Cesar Victora of the Federal University of Pelotas. Benign in most people, the mosquito-borne virus has been linked to microcephaly -- a shrinking of the brain and skull -- in babies, and to rare adult-onset neurological problems such as Guillain-Barre Syndrome, which can result in paralysis and death.