KXII Health Headlines

Unapproved device buys time for new pair of lungs

Posted: 07/02/2014 - PITTSBURGH (AP) - An Oklahoma man is slowly gaining strength at a Pittsburgh hospital with a second set of transplanted lungs in a procedure that was possible only through a device that until now hasn't been used in the U.S.

Warning signs and how to prevent a drowning

Updated: 06/19/2014 - DENISON, TX -- As the temperatures rise in Texoma, lifeguards and emergency crews are concerned about an increase in drowning accidents as more people hit the water.

FDA prepping long-awaited plan to reduce salt

Posted: 06/17/2014 - WASHINGTON (AP) - Food companies and restaurants could soon face government pressure to make their foods less salty - a long-awaited federal effort to try to prevent thousands of deaths each year from heart disease and stroke.

Safe Family: BB gun problems

Posted: 05/22/2014 - IOWA -- An Iowa woman is warning parents about the dangers of BB guns. She was hit in the chest and it is now lodged in her body. Vanessa Peng has her story in today's safe family report.

Kids get codeine in ER despite risks, guidelines

Posted: 04/21/2014 - CHICAGO (AP) - Despite recommended limits on codeine use in children, the potent painkiller is prescribed for children in at least half a million emergency room visits each year, a study suggests.

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  • DNA research deployed in war on cancer scoops Nobel Prize

    Professors Sara Snogerup Linse, Goran K. Hansson and Claes Gustafsson, members of the Nobel Assembly, talk to the media at a news conference at the Royal Swedish Academy in StockholmBy Daniel Dickson and Ben Hirschler STOCKHOLM/LONDON (Reuters) - Three scientists from Sweden, the United States and Turkey won the 2015 Nobel Prize for Chemistry on Wednesday for working out how cells repair damaged DNA, providing new ammunition in the war on cancer. Detailed understanding of DNA damage has helped drive a revolution in cancer treatment as researchers develop new drugs that target specific molecular pathways used by tumor cells to proliferate. Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar won the prize for "mechanistic studies of DNA repair".

  • MSF calls for independent inquiry into U.S. attack on Afghan hospital

    Afghan guards stand at the gate of MSF hospital after an air strike in the city of KunduzBy Stephanie Nebehay GENEVA (Reuters) - Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) called on Wednesday for an independent international fact-finding commission to be established to investigate the U.S. bombing of its hospital in Kunduz, Afghanistan, which it deems a war crime. The medical charity said that the commission, which can be set up at the request of a single state under the Geneva Convention, would gather facts and evidence from the United States, NATO and Afghanistan. "If we let this go, we are basically giving a blank check to any countries at war," MSF International President Joanne Liu told a news briefing in Geneva.

  • DNA scientists win 2015 Nobel Prize for Chemistry

    Professors Sara Snogerup Linse, Goran K. Hansson and Claes Gustafsson, members of the Nobel Assembly, talk to the media at a news conference at the Royal Swedish Academy in StockholmSweden's Tomas Lindahl, American Paul Modrich and Turkish-born Aziz Sancar won the 2015 Nobel Prize for Chemistry for work on mapping how cells repair damaged DNA, giving insight into cancer treatments, the award-giving body said on Wednesday. "Their work has provided fundamental knowledge of how a living cell functions and is, for instance, used for the development of new cancer treatments," the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said in a statement awarding the 8 million Swedish crowns ($969,000) Thousands of spontaneous changes to a cell's genome occur on a daily basis while radiation, free radicals and carcinogenic substances can also damage DNA. To keep genetic materials from disintegrating, a range of molecular systems monitor and repair DNA, in processes that the three award-winning scientists all helped map out, opening the door to applications such as new cancer treatments.

  • Teens who spend too much time on internet at risk of high blood pressure: study

    Too much internet time puts teens at increased risk of high blood pressure, according to a US study.A new study shows that excessive time spent on the internet can increase a teenager's risk of high blood pressure. In their study, researchers from the Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit found that teens who spent a minimum of 14 hours a week on the internet had elevated blood pressure. Physical exams were conducted on 335 teens aged 14 -17 who also filled out questionnaires on their internet habits.

  • South Africa's Transnet considering billions in capex cuts: sources
    South African logistics utility Transnet is considering up to 200 billion rand ($14.5 billion) in cuts to its capital expansion plans over the next three years, two sources at the company said, as the global demand for iron ore and coal stalls. A second senior source confirmed the "drastic" plans meant capital spending over the next three years under the plan was likely to drop to 100-150 billion rand because demand for the iron ore that Transnet ships is falling on slow growth in China. "It's because of the downturn – the volumes are not matching that well with the capital expenditure," said the source, adding that the company's plans to expand its coal and manganese lines would not be affected.
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