KXII Health Headlines

Unapproved device buys time for new pair of lungs

Posted: 07/02/2014 - PITTSBURGH (AP) - An Oklahoma man is slowly gaining strength at a Pittsburgh hospital with a second set of transplanted lungs in a procedure that was possible only through a device that until now hasn't been used in the U.S.

Warning signs and how to prevent a drowning

Updated: 06/19/2014 - DENISON, TX -- As the temperatures rise in Texoma, lifeguards and emergency crews are concerned about an increase in drowning accidents as more people hit the water.

FDA prepping long-awaited plan to reduce salt

Posted: 06/17/2014 - WASHINGTON (AP) - Food companies and restaurants could soon face government pressure to make their foods less salty - a long-awaited federal effort to try to prevent thousands of deaths each year from heart disease and stroke.

Safe Family: BB gun problems

Posted: 05/22/2014 - IOWA -- An Iowa woman is warning parents about the dangers of BB guns. She was hit in the chest and it is now lodged in her body. Vanessa Peng has her story in today's safe family report.
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Kids get codeine in ER despite risks, guidelines

Posted: 04/21/2014 - CHICAGO (AP) - Despite recommended limits on codeine use in children, the potent painkiller is prescribed for children in at least half a million emergency room visits each year, a study suggests.

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  • China hospital staff demand better security after deadly brawl
    Hospital staff have demonstrated in China to demand better protection after a doctor and a patient were killed in a fight, media reported on Monday, the latest incident to highlight problems in a system often overwhelmed with patients. The deaths came on Saturday when a drunk man seeking treatment for an injury started a fight with a doctor and they both then plummeted down an elevator shaft, the official Xinhua news agency reported.
  • Medical pot only OK for sick kids failed by other drugs: MDs

    FILE-This Jan. 13, 2015 file photo, shows parents of children who suffer from epilepsy. With virtually no hard proof that medical marijuana benefits sick children, and evidence that it may harm developing brains, the drug should only be used for severely ill kids who have no other treatment option, the nation's most influential pediatricians group says in a new policy. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)CHICAGO (AP) — With virtually no hard proof that medical marijuana benefits sick children, and evidence that it may harm developing brains, the drug should only be used for severely ill kids who have no other treatment option, the nation's most influential pediatricians group says in a new policy.


  • Regeneron/Sanofi cholesterol drug gets FDA priority review
    Regeneron Pharmaceuticals on Monday said U.S. health regulators accepted its application to review a potent cholesterol drug on a priority basis, potentially giving it the upper hand in a fierce race with Amgen to bring a new medicine from the promising class to market. Regeneron, which is developing the drug, alirocumab, in partnership with Sanofi, said the target date for a Food and Drug Administration approval decision was July 24, following a six-month review period.
  • Safety concerns cloud early promise of powerful new cancer drugs
    By Ransdell Pierson NEW YORK (Reuters) - A new wave of experimental cancer drugs that directly recruit the immune system's powerful T cells are proving to be immensely effective weapons against tumors, potentially transforming the $100 billion global market for drugs that fight the disease. In some trials, the two new approaches, known as CAR T cells and bispecific antibodies, have eliminated all traces of blood cancers in 40 percent to 90 percent of patients who had no remaining options. Bispecific antibodies are a twist on conventional antibodies, Y-shaped proteins whose two arms grasp for the same protein target found on cancer cells. With bispecifics, one arm of the antibody typically grasps a cancer cell while the other arm takes hold of T cells, bringing the mortal enemies into contact. The T cell punches holes into the adjacent tumor cell and injects deadly enzymes.
  • U.S. pediatricians reaffirm opposition to legalized pot
    By Andrew M. Seaman (Reuters Health) - Despite moves by some states to allow recreational and medical use of marijuana, a large group of U.S. pediatricians says in a new statement that the substance should remain – for the most part – illegal. In an update to its 2004 position statement on the matter, the American Academy of Pediatrics also calls for decriminalization of marijuana to lessen the lasting effects of criminal charges brought against youths – especially minorities. Decriminalization of marijuana “takes this whole issue out of the criminal justice system and puts it into the health system, where it really should be,” said Dr. Seth Ammerman, the statement’s lead author from Stanford University in California. “What that would look like - we hope – (is) if you’re found to be in possession of marijuana as a kid, instead of going to jail, juvenile hall or getting some sort of record, you’d be put in some sort of diversion or treatment program,” Ammerman told Reuters Health.
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