KXII Health Headlines

Unapproved device buys time for new pair of lungs

Posted: 07/02/2014 - PITTSBURGH (AP) - An Oklahoma man is slowly gaining strength at a Pittsburgh hospital with a second set of transplanted lungs in a procedure that was possible only through a device that until now hasn't been used in the U.S.

Warning signs and how to prevent a drowning

Updated: 06/19/2014 - DENISON, TX -- As the temperatures rise in Texoma, lifeguards and emergency crews are concerned about an increase in drowning accidents as more people hit the water.

FDA prepping long-awaited plan to reduce salt

Posted: 06/17/2014 - WASHINGTON (AP) - Food companies and restaurants could soon face government pressure to make their foods less salty - a long-awaited federal effort to try to prevent thousands of deaths each year from heart disease and stroke.

Safe Family: BB gun problems

Posted: 05/22/2014 - IOWA -- An Iowa woman is warning parents about the dangers of BB guns. She was hit in the chest and it is now lodged in her body. Vanessa Peng has her story in today's safe family report.
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Kids get codeine in ER despite risks, guidelines

Posted: 04/21/2014 - CHICAGO (AP) - Despite recommended limits on codeine use in children, the potent painkiller is prescribed for children in at least half a million emergency room visits each year, a study suggests.

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  • Brain-Eating Amoeba Kills California Woman

    Brain-Eating Amoeba Kills California WomanA 21-year-old woman from Bishop, California, has reportedly died from a rare but devastating infection caused by a brain-eating amoeba.Inyo County public health officials told the Reno Gazette-Journal that the woman died on June 20 after being infected by Naegleria fowleri, a microscopic amoeba usually found in warm freshwater and soil. The...


  • Thailand's first MERS case to leave hospital
    An Omani man who became Thailand's first case of Middle East Respiratory Sydnrome (MERS) has made a full recovery and will be discharged from hospital on Friday, Thailand's health minister said. The 75-year-old man, who had traveled to Bangkok for treatment for a heart condition and was then diagnosed with the virus, was declared free of the disease earlier this week. "The medical team looking after the patient and three of his relatives have decided that they can return home," Thai Public Health Minister Rajata Rajatanavin told reporters, adding that the man and three of his relatives who traveled with him to Bangkok were preparing to leave an infectious diseases facility.
  • Liberia investigating animal link after Ebola re-emerges

    Health workers collect the body of a suspected Ebola victim from a street in the town of KoiduBy Alphonso Toweh and James Harding Giahyue MONROVIA (Reuters) - Liberia confirmed a third Ebola case on Thursday, nearly two months after it was declared Ebola free, and officials said they were investigating whether the disease had spread through animals before resurfacing. Dr Moses Massaquoi, case management team leader for Liberia's Ebola task force, said the three villagers who had tested positive for the disease "have a history of having had dog meat together." Dog meat is commonly eaten in Liberia. The first new Liberian sufferer, 17-year-old Abraham Memaigar, died on Sunday in the village of Nedowein, about 50 km (30 miles) from the capital Monrovia.


  • Aetna to buy Humana for $37 billion in cash and stock

    A trader points up at a display on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange(Reuters) - Health insurer Aetna Inc said it will buy Humana Inc for about $37 billion, or about $230 per share, in a cash-and-stock deal. Humana shareholders will receive $125 in cash and 0.8375 Aetna shares for each share held, an about 23 percent premium to the stock's closing price on Thursday. Following the deal, Aetna's shareholders would own about 74 percent of the combined company.


  • Could insulin pills prevent diabetes? Big study seeks answer

    In this photo taken Wednesday, May 13, 2015, Hayden Murphy, 13, sits for a photo with his medicine at his home in Plainfield, Ill. Hayden is among more than 400 children and adults participating in U.S. government-funded international research investigating whether experimental insulin capsules can prevent or at least delay Type 1 diabetes. To enroll, participants must first get bad news: results of a blood test showing their chances for developing the disease are high. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)CHICAGO (AP) — For nearly a century, insulin has been a life-saving diabetes treatment. Now scientists are testing a tantalizing question: What if pills containing the same medicine patients inject every day could also prevent the disease?


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