KXII Health Headlines

Unapproved device buys time for new pair of lungs

Posted: 07/02/2014 - PITTSBURGH (AP) - An Oklahoma man is slowly gaining strength at a Pittsburgh hospital with a second set of transplanted lungs in a procedure that was possible only through a device that until now hasn't been used in the U.S.

Warning signs and how to prevent a drowning

Updated: 06/19/2014 - DENISON, TX -- As the temperatures rise in Texoma, lifeguards and emergency crews are concerned about an increase in drowning accidents as more people hit the water.

FDA prepping long-awaited plan to reduce salt

Posted: 06/17/2014 - WASHINGTON (AP) - Food companies and restaurants could soon face government pressure to make their foods less salty - a long-awaited federal effort to try to prevent thousands of deaths each year from heart disease and stroke.

Safe Family: BB gun problems

Posted: 05/22/2014 - IOWA -- An Iowa woman is warning parents about the dangers of BB guns. She was hit in the chest and it is now lodged in her body. Vanessa Peng has her story in today's safe family report.
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Kids get codeine in ER despite risks, guidelines

Posted: 04/21/2014 - CHICAGO (AP) - Despite recommended limits on codeine use in children, the potent painkiller is prescribed for children in at least half a million emergency room visits each year, a study suggests.

Health overhaul signup ends, survives for now

Posted: 03/31/2014 - WASHINGTON (AP) - Monday marks the end of the six-month sign-up period for insurance under President Barack Obama's health care overhaul, a highly controversial attempt to reduce the number of Americans without medical coverage, estimated at about 50 million.

Study finds many preteens have high cholesterol

Posted: 03/28/2014 - There's fresh evidence that a lot of young people could be headed for heart trouble. A large study of preteens in Texas found that about one-third of them had borderline or high cholesterol when tested during routine physical exams.

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  • Why isn't there a treatment or vaccine for Ebola?

    FILE - In this Saturday, Sept. 29, 2007, file photo, A 43 year old Congolese patient, center, who has been confirmed to have Ebola hemorrhagic fever, following laboratory tests, is comforted by Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors without Borders) nurse Isabel Grovas, left, and Doctor Hilde Declerck, right, in Kampungu, Kasai Occidental province, Congo. In the four decades since the Ebola virus was first identified in Africa, treatment hasn’t changed much. There are no licensed drugs or vaccines for the deadly disease. A number are being developed, but none have been rigorously tested in humans. One experimental treatment, though, was tried this week in an American aid worker sick with Ebola, according to the U.S-based group that she works for in Liberia. Without a specific treatment, doctors and nurses focus on easing the disease’s symptoms _ fever, headache, vomiting and diarrhea _ and on keeping patients hydrated and comfortable. (AP Photo/WHO, Christopher Black, File)LONDON (AP) — In the four decades since the Ebola virus was first identified in Africa, treatment hasn't changed much. There are no licensed drugs or vaccines for the deadly disease.


  • Americans with Ebola returning to US for treatment

    In this undated photo released by the Center for Disease Control, a Aeromedical Biological Containment System which looks like a sealed isolation tent for Ebola air transportation is shown. On Thursday afternoon July 31, 2014, officials at Atlanta's Emory University Hospital said they expected one of the Americans to be transferred there "within the next several days." The hospital declined to identify which aid worker, citing privacy laws. (AP Photo/Center for Disease Control)NEW YORK (AP) — Two American aid workers seriously ill with Ebola will be brought from West Africa to Atlanta for treatment in one of the most tightly sealed isolation units in the country, officials said Friday.


  • Colorado panel considers new look for edible pot

    FILE - In this June 19, 2014, file photo, chef Alex Tretter carries a tray of cannabis-infused peanut butter and jelly cups to the oven for baking at Sweet Grass Kitchen, a well-established Denver-based gourmet marijuana edibles bakery which sells its confections to retail outlets throughout the state. Colorado marijuana regulators have drafted an emergency rule aimed at making it easier for new marijuana users to tell how much pot they are eating. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File)GOLDEN, Colo. (AP) — Marijuana can go in more than brownies and cookies. And the dizzying variety of foods that can be infused with the drug is complicating matters for Colorado regulators who want to make sure pot-infused edibles and drinks won't be confused with regular foods.


  • U.S. prepares to receive two American aid workers stricken with Ebola

    Handout photo of Dr. Kent Brantly speaking with colleagues at the case management center on the campus of ELWA Hospital in MonroviaBy David Beasley ATLANTA (Reuters) - Two American aid workers, both seriously ill after being infected with the deadly Ebola virus in Liberia, will be flown to the United States and treated in isolation at an Atlanta hospital, officials said on Friday. A plane equipped to transport Dr. Kent Brantly and missionary Nancy Writebol can carry only one patient back at a time, and Christian relief group Samaritan's Purse said it did not know who would return first. Both medical evacuations are due to be completed by early next week, said North Carolina-based Samaritan's Purse, as officials said bringing the stricken aid workers to the United States would not put the American public at risk.


  • Express Scripts drops Amgen anemia drugs from formulary
    (Reuters) - Express Scripts Holding Co, the largest U.S. pharmacy benefit manager, on Friday said it will remove 25 products from its 2015 list of preferred drugs, including anemia treatments Epogen and Aranesp, both sold by Amgen Inc. The company will continue to include Procrit, a similar anemia drug sold by Johnson & Johnson, on its list of preferred drugs, or formulary. "The products we have chosen to exclude from our formulary are those that cost significantly more than other available options but that fail to provide additional health benefit," the company said in an emailed statement.
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