KXII Health Headlines

Unapproved device buys time for new pair of lungs

Posted: 07/02/2014 - PITTSBURGH (AP) - An Oklahoma man is slowly gaining strength at a Pittsburgh hospital with a second set of transplanted lungs in a procedure that was possible only through a device that until now hasn't been used in the U.S.

Warning signs and how to prevent a drowning

Updated: 06/19/2014 - DENISON, TX -- As the temperatures rise in Texoma, lifeguards and emergency crews are concerned about an increase in drowning accidents as more people hit the water.

FDA prepping long-awaited plan to reduce salt

Posted: 06/17/2014 - WASHINGTON (AP) - Food companies and restaurants could soon face government pressure to make their foods less salty - a long-awaited federal effort to try to prevent thousands of deaths each year from heart disease and stroke.

Safe Family: BB gun problems

Posted: 05/22/2014 - IOWA -- An Iowa woman is warning parents about the dangers of BB guns. She was hit in the chest and it is now lodged in her body. Vanessa Peng has her story in today's safe family report.
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Kids get codeine in ER despite risks, guidelines

Posted: 04/21/2014 - CHICAGO (AP) - Despite recommended limits on codeine use in children, the potent painkiller is prescribed for children in at least half a million emergency room visits each year, a study suggests.

Health overhaul signup ends, survives for now

Posted: 03/31/2014 - WASHINGTON (AP) - Monday marks the end of the six-month sign-up period for insurance under President Barack Obama's health care overhaul, a highly controversial attempt to reduce the number of Americans without medical coverage, estimated at about 50 million.

Study finds many preteens have high cholesterol

Posted: 03/28/2014 - There's fresh evidence that a lot of young people could be headed for heart trouble. A large study of preteens in Texas found that about one-third of them had borderline or high cholesterol when tested during routine physical exams.

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  • Spanish judge orders release of ill boy's parents

    This is an undated handout photos issued by England's Hampshire Police on Monday Sept. 1, 2014, of Brett King and Naghemeh King, the parents of Ashya King, who have legal proceedings against them continuing in Spain after they took the five-year-old brain cancer patient out of hospital without doctors' consent. Critically-ill 5-year-old boy Ashya King driven to Spain by his parents is receiving medical treatment for a brain tumor in a Spanish hospital as his parents await extradition to Britain, police said Sunday Aug. 31 2014. Officers received a phone call late Saturday from a hotel east of Malaga advising that a vehicle fitting the description circulated by police was on its premises. Both parents were arrested and the boy, Ashya King, was taken to a hospital, a Spanish police spokesman said. (AP Photo/Hampshire Police)SOTO DEL REAL, Spain (AP) — Spanish officials have ordered the immediate release of a detained British couple who were wanted by police in the United Kingdom after they took their critically ill child for treatment abroad without doctors' consent.


  • Players using psychologists to find the extra one percent
    By Simon Cambers NEW YORK (Reuters) - Tennis players are always looking for that extra 1 percent, the unseen edge that could take them to the very top. A common sight for years in golf and now used extensively in sports like cycling and athletics, for a long time it seemed as though tennis players were reluctant to open up their minds, perhaps fearful of what they might find. Murray has had something of a love-hate relationship with sports psychologists over his career, initially finding them a bit odd, unclear how someone who had never played the game would be able to help him on court. Open, with South Africa's Kevin Anderson praising her for helping him win close matches and rebound from tough defeats.
  • Mississippi woman gets life sentence in fatal buttocks injection case

    FILE - This Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2014 file photo shows Tracey Lynn Garner during her trial in Jackson, Miss. On Friday, Aug. 29, 2014, Garner was convicted of murder in connection to illicit silicone buttocks injections that led to a Georgia woman's death. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)A Mississippi woman convicted of murder for administering an unlicensed silicone buttocks injection to a patient who later died was sentenced on Tuesday to life in prison.  Tracey Lynn Garner, 54, performed the unlicensed injection in 2012 in her Jackson home on 37-year-old Karima Gordon, who fell ill immediately after the procedure and died a few days later. A jury last week found Garner guilty of depraved-heart murder. Prosecutors argued during the trial that Garner was motivated by greed.  Garner faces a separate trial in the death of Marilyn Hale, an Alabama woman who authorities say died under similar circumstances two years earlier. Lee McDivitt, an investigator for the Mississippi Attorney General's Office, testified during the trial that he found a large bottle of silicone and syringes in Garner's home that were labeled "veterinary use only." Garner, who is transgender, was formerly named Morris Garner.


  • Wealthy countries must send medical teams to halt Ebola: Medecins Sans Frontieres
    The worst ever outbreak of the Ebola virus will not be halted unless wealthy nations dispatch specialized biological disaster response teams to West Africa to stop its spread, the head of medical charity Medecins Sans Frontieres said on Tuesday. "Six months into the worst Ebola epidemic in history, the world is losing the battle to contain it," MSF President Joanne Liu said in a speech to United Nations member states. She said aid charities and West African governments did not have the capacity to stem the outbreak and needed intervention by foreign states. The organization is known in the United States as Doctors Without Borders.
  • West Africa struggles to contain Ebola as warnings and deaths mount

    A man washes his hands at a tap outside the Green Pharmacy at Area 8 in AbujaDoctors in Liberia were out on strike on Tuesday as they struggled to cope with the outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus, while the United Nations warned the spread of the disease in West Africa was causing food shortages in one of the world's poorest regions. Medical charity Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) said 800 more beds for Ebola patients were urgently needed in the Liberian capital Monrovia alone, while in Sierra Leone highly infectious bodies were rotting in the streets. MSF called for rich nations to send military medical teams to support buckling healthcare systems in West Africa.


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