System implementing anti-meth law expected Oct. 1

By: AP Wires
By: AP Wires

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) - An electronic system to connect Oklahoma with other states to track sales of drugs containing a key ingredient in methamphetamine is expected to be running by October 1st.

A state law approved earlier this year established the system went into effect July 1st - and state Bureau of Narcotics spokesman Mark Woodward said work to integrate the state's current system into the system is under way.

Woodward said Oklahoma is the only state that already has a real-time tracking system in place while other states were simply "plugged into" the larger system.

Edmond pharmacist Sherry Ross says she thinks the move is well-intentioned - but says she'd rather see authorities focusing on drug dealers and sellers and on prescription pain-killer abuse.

(Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)


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  • by x on Jul 23, 2012 at 03:14 PM
    its stupid to have to show your life history to get meds
  • by Anonymous on Jul 23, 2012 at 08:18 AM
    This law will put a crimp in the small time cook and give more business to the cartels who have no need for over the counter chemicals to produce meth. But will meth use decline? I doubt it. It may raise prices somewhat and it may mean the need to do more crime to pay for it though. Meth heads don't quit because the price goes up.
  • by Anonymous on Jul 23, 2012 at 06:46 AM
    "Edmond pharmacist Sherry Ross says she thinks the move is well-intentioned - but says she'd rather see authorities focusing on drug dealers and sellers and on prescription pain-killer abuse." THIS ^ too many young people dieing everyday due to LEGAL drug abuse.
  • by Pete on Jul 23, 2012 at 06:05 AM
    While I think this idea is a step in the right direction, it's not enough. Like the other person said they will find a way around it. Focusing on one aspect is almost like ignoring all others!
    The pharmicist mentioned prescription drug abuse. I have never seen doctors hand out prescriptions like they do at mercy hospital. Give out narcotic pain killers to anyone who comes in, with pretty much no questions asked! Maybe they should connect all databases for prescriptions...
  • by Anonymous on Jul 22, 2012 at 07:22 PM
    meth heads will figure out other ways.
    • reply
      by Logic on Jul 24, 2012 at 02:33 PM in reply to
      What the cooks do is include with their price for their drugs a box of cold medicine. You pay cash plus the medicine. Over a few days they get what they need. Each user is out there getting everyone they know to go buy a single box, thus remaining under the radar. This law winds up making it harder for legitimate use of the medicine, while creating a lucrative secondary market among the cooks and users. Just like prescription pain pills. You can sell a single 10mg Hydrocodone for between 5-10 dollars each. An actual prescription of about 120 pills at the pharmacy goes for about 90-100 dollars. So multiply 5 dollars each times 120. Well...you can see the money being made here. These laws simple make the criminals richer and provides them a market to exploit..while making the rest of us jump through hoops to get what we need. Ridiculous.
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