Slain reporter's mom calls for stricter gun laws

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Reporter Alison Parker was shot and killed almost a year ago by a former co-worker.

"Alison's death, because it was on live television and has been repeated over and over, really shocked people to an extent into thinking... it could be me, it could be my child," Barbara Parker, Alison's mom, said.

Barbara grew up in Denison and still has family in Sherman.

"We've had guns," Parker said. "I grew up with my father as a hunter."

Barbara said she never thought this would happen to her.

"But when it did, we realized we had to speak out," Parker said.

Now, a year after her daughter's death, Barbara said she is spending a lot of her time advocating for stricter gun laws.

"There's a culture in our country now among our legislatures that it's collateral damage, it's acceptable," Parker said. "But it's not acceptable to us."

After the massacre in Orlando in June, four new gun proposals were voted on in congress. They all failed.

That includes an idea by U.S. Senator James Lankford (R-Ok) to delay gun sales to people on an FBI terrorist watch list for only up to three days, until it's reviewed by a court.

"None of us want any person that is a terrorist to have a gun, that's a given," Lankford said. "But we also don't want people to lose their second amendment rights because they are on a secret attorney general's list."

Right now there are 11 reasons that you can't buy a gun.

"For instance, if you're a convicted felon, you lose your right to be able to have a gun," Lankford said.

But Parker said she would like to see more.

"Mental health is another issue that's part of that, domestic violence."

Senator Lankford said congress is focused on fighting terrorism and doesn't see any gun laws passing soon.

Parker said that won't stop her from fighting for change.

"Guns were made to kill and we will do whatever it takes to prevent other families from feeling what we feel."