Benefit concert held for those affected by Denison fire

DENISON, Tex. (KXII) - Last month, a fire devastated downtown Denison leaving three families without a home and businesses destroyed.

Sunday hundreds of people showed their support at a concert to raise money for those affected.

"When you see it right here in your backyard it's devastating," Tom Bean resident Cyndi Collins said.

Collins was one of the first people at the Denison Forward Benefit Concert Sunday.

She wanted to show her support to the people affected by the Main Street fire.

"I have found Sherman and Denison to be wonderful communities especially for helping people," Collins said.

Owner of Overdrive Entertainment Jason Smith said when he and his business partner heard about the damage the fire caused they knew they had to do something.

"Everybody is volunteering their time and their services today so every dollar raised is going to the people that lost so much in the fires," Smith said.

People paid $10 to listen to nearly a dozen musicians from around the area.

One of the musicians was >a href="https://www.facebook.com/AustinMichaelUS/">Austin Michael , a contestant on season 17 of American Idol.

"When I heard that all the benefits were going to repair the damages due to the fire, I was just really excited to help out," Michael said.

Michael said the cause hit close to home.

"I understand how it feels to lose something due to a fire. Our house burned down in Van Alstyne on January 31, and so I understand what it's like to be there," Michael said.

12-year-old country singer Sawyer Guymon said he also wanted to help.

"So the buildings that burned, it's going to cost a lot of money to get those back up, and it's great to just bring money back for that," Guymon said.

Smith said the artists are a mix of genres from country to blues and rock music.

Along with the live music, there were food trucks, T-shirt sales and a silent auction at City Hall.

Smith said they planned the event in about three days, and none of it would have been possible without community support.

"Literally that first day that we said we were going to do this, about 30 minutes of phone calls, I had most of it done," Smith said.

An account called Denison Forward at First United Bank is still accepting donations.